Mental Health Safety Improvement Programme

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In A Nutshell:

The work aims to improve safety by reducing harm to people who use mental health services. By using a quality improvement approach and through co-design with staff and service users to reduce the use of restrictive practice (physical restraint, seclusion, rapid tranquilisation) on inpatient areas.

The National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) runs a number of quality improvement programs around patient safety to improve the safety of mental health services. They have previously tested and created a change package for the reduction of the use of restrictive practice and this work is based on the learning from that pilot.

The Use of Force Act became law in November 2018 following inappropriate use of restraint causing the death of Olaseni Lewis. The aim of the act and the guidance is to clearly set out the measures that are needed to prevent the inappropriate use of force and to prevent harm.

The use of restraint can have a psychological and physical effect on patients who are already a vulnerable group of people.

There are marked inequalities by age, sex, gender and race that can vary between services that need to be stopped.

The program will be done collaboratively with service users and teams for systematic improvement to overall reduce restrictive practice across Y&H.

We are developing a Mental Health Patient Safety Network for Y&H as the key vehicle to drive patient safety improvement work.

We are working with frontline teams and service users on wards to support the testing of ideas for improvements to reduce restrictive practice, learning from the work will be shared regionally through our Y&H Learning community and spread across the region.

who we are working with

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"The whole ward team have really embraced the safety huddle concept. We have reached the milestone of 30 days without a fall today"

Dr Alan Hart-Thomas, Clinical Director